I own a European slimline PS2, along with an original, larger Japanese console.

Art of Fighting
Video length: 21:14
Game region:
Difficulty level: 4 out of 5

Playthrough with Ryo, using the version included on Art of Fighting Anthology. The first game has a reputation for being quite hard, but I don't think it gets too difficult until you reach the bosses. For Mr. Big you just want to let him come to you and then hit him after he's used his roll or cross diving move. The final boss is trickier, but there are a few things he tends to fall for (such as countering his jumps with a standing kick).





Art of Fighting 2
Video length: 34:22
Game region:
Difficulty level:

This is a playthrough with Ryo, using the version included on Art of Fighting Anthology. This was the game that put me off trying to do playthroughs of this series, as I'd never managed to one credit clear this game and clear it without losing any rounds before. The reason I wanted to do it without losing any rounds is because there is an extra boss battle against Geese Howard at the end of the game if you do it.

Art of Fighting 2
has a reputation for being one of the most difficult fighting games ever, as it's pretty much SNK boss syndrome for the entire game. There are a few tactics you can use against certain opponents that can help. For example, it's possible to taunt Eiji and Mr. Big to make them jump at you, so you do a strong kick to knock them back and repeat.

Some opponents are just horrible to fight though, I'd say Micky has some of the most unfun A.I. I've ever come across in a game. The stiff controls also don't help matters, along with the flawed button layout. I did eventually manage to clear it and get to Geese and beat him, so thank goodness for that.





Art of Fighting 3: The Path of the Warrior
Video length: 20:10
Game region:
Difficulty level: 4 out of 5

The third game is easier than the other two, but can still be tough. Once again I'm using Ryo, playing through the version on Art of Fighting Anthology.





Crisis Zone
Video length: See below
Game region:
Difficulty level: 4 out of 5

A spin-off of the Time Crisis series where instead of having a handgun you have a machinegun and instead of taking cover behind objects you take cover behind the world's strongest ever riot shield. Most enemies have health bars so you've got to shoot them a few times before they die, but most of them don't take that many hits to kill.

The PS2 port of the game features more detailed graphics than the arcade version, along with an entirely new scenario. The Garland Square story was featured in the arcade game, and features four stages. I did fine in stages one and two, but stage three was where I lost two of my lives. I just can't seem to get good at the bosses of the third stage, the fat guy I can deal with but the guy with the blades always gives me trouble.

I lost a third life in the fourth stage due to running out of time, but that was OK as the boss is just some old guy you can't help but feel slightly sorry for as the good guys blast the hell out of him in the ending. He wasn't even an old guy in the arcade version, either. I wonder why they changed his appearance?

The second video is a playthrough of the Grassmarket District story, which is a new set of levels added for the PS2 port. This stages are much harder than the others as enemies are constantly firing accurate shots at you. I take a single hit from enemy fire and then lost another life due to running out of time on the big boss. I've never been able to beat that boss without running out of time at least once.


Garland Square playthrough (32:28)
Grassmarket District playthrough (33:29)



Dead or Alive 2
Video length: 11:35
Game region:
Difficulty level: 3 out of 5

Playthrough with Jahn-Lee. The game is easier than the first one, but towards the end the CPU opponents can get a bit too counter-happy for my liking. The boss is bad for this too, but in this video I make him look a lot easier to beat than he usually is.





Dead or Alive 2: Hardcore
Video length: 10:12
Game region:
Difficulty level: 3 out of 5

Playthrough with Ayane. Hardcore is the version to get out of the two (or the only version for us Europeans, even though it dropped the "Hardcore" subtitle). It adds some new content, such as new stages and costumes.

More importantly the Japanese version still has the utterly hilarious English dub in it, which I've used in this video. "Sorry, I'm not sweet!"





Garou Mark of the Wolves
Video length: 24:40
Game region:
Difficulty level: 3 out of 5

Playthrough with Marco (who's known as Khushnood Butt in the American version). Mark of the Wolves is one of the easier SNK fighters, and even the bosses aren't that bad for once. The final boss gets a big advantage in the last round since he gets infinite T.O.P., but even then he doesn't quite suffer from SNK Boss Syndrome.

One little tip: if you ever knock the CPU down, throw a fireball out and time it so it makes contact with the opponent as they get up. The CPU never seems to block this, so it lets you get a free hit in.





Hokuto no Ken:
Shinpan no Sousousei Kengou Retsuden
Video length: See below
Game region:
Difficulty level: 3 out of 5

Two playthroughs for this game: one with Kenoh, and one with Shin. Kenoh is the final boss and is an alternate version of Raoh, with more powerful attacks. I believe he can't be played as in the arcade version, but for this PS2 port he can be unlocked.

CPU Kenoh will come back to life when you beat him in the final round, but even so this game isn't too difficult overall, so long as you know what you're doing.

You can thank this game for this part of the site to even exist, by the way.


Kenoh playthrough (25:29)
Shin playthrough (31:38)



Hyper Street Fighter II
Video length: 19:51
Game region:
Difficulty level: 4 out of 5

Playthrough with the Champion Edition version of Ken (this game lets you select a character from any version of Street Fighter II). Now this game's default difficulty setting is the easiest -which is fine by me, since that's what I usually play on. And despite this I still the game is hard, especially if you intend to beat it without losing any rounds so you can fight Gouki. The Dualshock controller doesn't work that well with this game either, in my opinion.





The King of Fighters '94
Video length: 30:59
Game region:
Difficulty level: 5 out of 5

Playthrough of the version included on SNK Arcade Classics Vol. 1, using the Art of Fighting team. The PS2 version of this collection is a quick port of the PSP version, leading to some problems. The European version has a horribly laggy intro, and the 50hz mode makes the games lag and become unplayable.

There is, at least, a 60hz option, but even with that turned on there are still problems with lag in games, as you'll see in this video. The Wii version does not have these problems and I'd suggest going for that version of the collection.

Oh right, the game. KoF '94 is probably the most difficult one in the series. The further you get into the game, the more difficult it gets, and if you end up having to fight the Japan team at the end, you've got a difficult battle. The boss of this game is Rugal, who has two forms. His first form has no special attacks, although his normal punches and kicks are strong, and also caused chip-damage if blocked. If you beat him, his last form is where he goes crazy, as he now has several powerful special attacks and is a nightmare to beat.





The King of Fighters '94 Re-bout
Video length: 31:20
Game region:
Difficulty level: 1 out of 5

Playthrough with Rugal, Saisyu and Ryo. This game was made as part of the KoF 10th anniversary celebrations, and it features new backgrounds along with cleaned up sprites. An edit mode was also added, letting you pick any characters you wanted for your team (you couldn't do this in the original game). Rugal was also made playable (well, his second form was) and Saisyu Kusanagi was also added. Neither of these characters were playable in the original.

I actually think this game is harder than the original '94, however, when you play as the bosses, it's easy. Clearly no time was spent updating the A.I., as it doesn't have a clue what to do against Saisyu's two hit lunge move.





The King of Fighters '95
Video length: 28:09
Game region:
Difficulty level: 4 out of 5

Playthrough of the version included on the Orochi Saga Collection, using the Art of Fighting team. This version has some short load times, but other than that there isn't anything wrong with it -although the music played during the ending doesn't loop, for some reason. Don't know if that was a one off glitch or if everyone's games do that.

The only hard part of this game are the two bosses. Saisyu isn't much of a problem when fighting him with Takuma, as you can just keep throwing super fireballs at him and then following up with a hien shippu kyaku if he jumps or dodges.

Omega Rugal is the main problem, and I really think I got lucky to beat him in this playthrough at all. When I was down to just Ryo, there were a couple of times where I jumped towards him, which is usually a massive mistake as he'll knock you out of the air with his genocide cutter. And yet he didn't do this, and I was able to score a small combo on him.





The King of Fighters '96
Video length: 36:14
Game region:
Difficulty level: 3 out of 5

Playthrough with the Sacred Treasures team (Kyo, Chizuru & Iori). This version of the game is included on The King of Fighters: Orochi, a collection released in Japan which contains KoFs '95, '96 and '97. This collection probably has the best versions of these games outside of owning the Neo Geo carts. Both '96 and '97 also have English language options.

This one was a little more difficult than usual since I'm not very good with Kyo (and prefer his '95 move set). Chizuru makes up for it though as she's a boss character, so her moves do good damage.





The King of Fighters '97
Video length: 36:13
Game region:
Difficulty level: 4 out of 5

Playthrough with the Fatal Fury team, using the extra gameplay system. This version of the game is included on the KoF Orochi collection. I'd already beaten the game with this team for the Playstation 1 version, but since that was in Japanese, here it is in English. Orochi, the final boss, is the hardest part of the game, and one of the tougher KoF bosses.





The King of Fighters '98
Video length: 32:33
Game region:
Difficulty level: 3 out of 5

Playthrough with Rugal, Iori and EX Robert, using the advanced gameplay system. This version of KoF '98 is from King of Fighters Collection: The Orochi Saga. It seems to be the worst game on the collection emulation wise, as not only does it have the longest load times, it also has a couple of glitches with the announcer when you get further into the single player mode. But hey, at least it's easier than KoF '97.





The King of Fighters '98 Ultimate Match
Video length: 18:51
Game region:
Difficulty level: 2 out of 5

Playthrough with the boss team (Omega Rugal, Goenitz and Orochi). For those who don't know, KoF '98 UM is a re-make of KoF '98 which adds new backgrounds, changes moves and adds characters who were missing from the original KoF '98, such as Kasumi, Eiji and Geese.

This game has several different bosses, and it depends on how many super move finishes you do to decide which one you'll get. I take the KoF '97 route and fight the Orochi powered versions of Chris, Shermie and Yashiro, before fighting Orochi himself. But when you have the likes of Orochi and Omega Rugal on your team, you really can't lose.

Regarding the European release of this game -Ignition Entertainment did release this game in Europe, but it seems it never made it into stores. I've only ever seen the European version sell online (I got mine from eBay). It seems something bad happened with the distribution of their final PS2 releases, as Samurai Shodown Anthology never made it into stores either.





The King of Fighters '99
Video length: 29:48
Game region:
Difficulty level: 3 out of 5

Playthrough with the Fatal Fury team. This version is on King of Fighters: Nests, a collection only released in Japan which contains the Dreamcast versions of KoFs 99, 2000 and 2001 along with the Neo Geo versions of the same games. I'm using the Neo Geo version for this video since it has an English language option. The Dreamcast version had an English language option, but it was removed from the Nests collection for some reason.

The Fatal Fury team also have two different endings in this game, which one you get depends on who you beat the boss with. I get the Mai ending. I also get to fight Iori after the boss in a secret battle.





The King of Fighters 2000
Video length: See below
Game region: &
Difficulty level: 3 out of 5

I have two videos for the PS2 version of the game. The first is from the European version, which is included on a two pack simply called "The King of Fighters", that also includes KoF 2001. The second video uses the version included on King of Fighters: Nests, a collection only released in Japan which contains the Dreamcast versions of KoFs '99, 2000 and 2001 along with the Neo Geo versions of the same games. I'm using the Neo Geo version for this video since it has an English language option.

As with all of the NESTS era KoF games, it isn't that difficult to get through the game, it's just the boss who can be a pain to beat. There is only one boss in this game and he isn't too hard, atlhough usually I have to beat him via time over.

I get to fight Kula, a hidden challenger in the game, to appear in both playthroughs.


Fatal Fury team playthrough (22:28)
Ryuuko no Ken team playthrough (27:17)



The King of Fighters 2001
Video length: See below
Game region: &
Difficulty level: 5 our of 5

Again, two videos for this one (European double pack version and Japanese KoF Nests Dreamcast version). I've said before how much I dislike this KoF, although they did sort one aspect out for the PS2 port: they re-did the character artwork and it looks much better than before.

For the European version I used Original Zero, who's team consists of himself and 3 striker characters, along with having no super gauge, so he can use his super moves whenever. At least, in theory -it seems to me that you can't always use his super moves when you want.

The second video uses the version included on King of Fighters: Nests. I'm using the Neo Geo version for this video since it has an English language option. I was finally able to beat Igniz -it turns out there is a really easy way to beat him, if you manage to jump over him just once.


Original Zero playthrough (18:46)
Ryuuko no Ken team playthrough (28:25)



The King of Fighters 2002
Video length: 25:12
Game region:
Difficulty level: 1 out of 5

Playthrough with Rugal, Geese and Goenitz. The PS2 version of this game has even more characters than the Dreamcast version, such as adding Geese and Goenitz to the roster (they have to be unlocked first). Some new backgrounds were also added, such as a new stage for Rugal. This version was released by itself in Japan and Europe, but in America it was released in a two pack which also had KoF 2003 on it.

Usually I'd give this a 4 out of 5, but if you've got Rugal on your team, you can easily beat the boss.





The King of Fighters 2002 Unlimited Match
Video length: 27:38
Game region:
Difficulty level: 2 out of 5

Playthrough with Terry, Krizalid and Omega Rugal. This is a re-make of KoF 2002, and contains a ton of extra characters along with new moves, new backgrounds and more. Sadly it was only released in Japan.

There are several different bosses and extra challengers you can face. I got to fight Namless as an extra challenger and Original Zero as the final boss. I also met the requirement to fight Omega Rugal as a secret boss at the end of the game.

And yes, any video of this game will have at least one boss character on my team. The bosses in this game do stupid damage to you, and after playing through so many of these KoF games with the default teams, I think I've earned it. Plus since this is a dream match game it has no story anyway.





The King of Fighters 2002 Unlimited Match:
Tougeki Ver.
Video length: 26:42
Game region:
Difficulty level: 2 out of 5

Playthrough with Igniz, Krizalid and EX Takuma. The "Tougeki ver" of 2002 UM was released for the PS2 in 2010, again only in Japan. This update got rid of a few glitches and also removed an infinite with Hinako. There are no new backgrounds, characters or anything like that. The only way you can tell the difference between this video and my previous 2002 UM video is that the title screen now has a copyright of 2010 rather than 2009.

This time I do manage to fight Igniz as the last boss, and fight Nameless as an extra challenger.





The King of Fighters 2003
Video length: 23:02
Game region:
Difficulty level: 2 out of 5

Playthrough with the Art of Fighting team. KoF 2003 changed a lot of things, the main one being that you can now switch between characters during a fight. You can also select a team leader, and whoever you pick for this gets to use their leader move (I picked Ryo).

It also has a few cheap bosses: first up are Chizuru and Maki, who aren't too bad as long as you keep Maki off in favor of fighting Chizuru. Mukai, on the other hand, is a real challenge. He's slow to move, but has a lot of powerful moves. However, he's actually really dumb, and seems to refuse to block when he gets up. Hence why getting him in the corner and then just spamming Ryo or Robert's hien shippu kyaku special moves works best.





The King of Fighters XI
Video length: 26:00
Game region:
Difficulty level: 4 out of 5

Playthrough with the Art of Fighting team, which now consists of Ryo, Yuri and King. KoF XI is one of the highlights of the series. The game has a huge character roster, and the PS2 version features several extra characters who were never in the arcade version. These characters include Robert and Mai, who's sprites have been taken from Neo Geo Battle Coliseum.

The game features the same character swapping option KoF 03 had, but has more options. Quick shift lets you swap characters during a combo, whilst saving shift lets you swap characters whilst under attack by the opponent. Being able to use these shifts depends on the new skill bar meter, which is a new gauge that's separate to the super move gauge. Another new feature is the "dream cancel", which lets your team leader cancel a super move into their leader super move, something which can be seen when Ryo fights Iori in this video.

In addition to the extra characters, the PS2 version also has a few other extra features, such as some new backgrounds and a gallery mode. The European version -which is what I'm using for this video -unfortunately had a few bugs in it, which is annoying. The Euro version was published by Ignition Entertainment, who delayed the game more than once, yet STILL managed to leave a couple of glitches in. You can see some of the bugs here.

SNK went back to dumb bosses for this installment. Shion isn't usually too difficult to beat, but Magaki is a nightmare. With projectiles constantly being thrown everywhere and a super move that covers the entire screen, he demonstrates once again how SNK have no idea how to make a good boss fight.





The King of Fighters Neowave
Video length: 19:15
Game region:
Difficulty level: 2 out of 5

Playthrough with the Fatal Fury team, using the Max 2 system. KoF Neowave was released in arcades in 2004, for Sammy's Atomiswave hardware. The Playstation 2 version was released in 2006 in Europe. Neowave is another dream match title, so there's no story and this time there isn't even win quotes. It does have a very large roster of characters, featuring nearly everyone from KoF 2002 along with some extra returning characters, such as Saisyu and Jhun.

The game is 3 vs 3, but now there are three different gameplay styles to choose from, similar to how you could choose between the advanced and extra modes seen in KoF '97. There's also the heat gauge, which when activated will increase your power at the cost of draining your life.

Young Geese, who was last seen in Art of Fighting 2, is the boss of Neowave, and has all the usual SNK boss syndrome features you'd expect: over-powered, cheap and immensely stupid, at least when fighting him with Terry. All you need to do is throw power waves to win.





NeoGeo Battle Coliseum
Video length: 15:23
Game region:
Difficulty level: 4 out of 5

Playthrough with Mr. Karate and Haohmaru, getting Mizuchi as the boss. There are four different bosses in the game, and depending on how many battle bonuses you use alters which one you'll get. If you want to see me fight the true final boss, see the Xbox 360 page.

The bosses are the usual cheap crap SNK loves so much, but this is where Haohmaru comes into play. He's got this sword see, that makes his standard strong punch attack do great damage, and this can easily be abused against the bosses, making him an ideal character to pick if you want to beat the game on one credit.





Ryuuko no Ken
Video length: 22:55
Game region:
Difficulty level: 4 out of 5

Playthrough with Ryo, using the version included on the Ryuuko no Ken Tenchijin collection . This is the Japanese version of Art of Fighting. I have the arranged OST on for this video. See the top of the page for more thoughts about the game.





Ryuuko no Ken 2
Video length: 34:15
Game region:
Difficulty level: 4 out of 5

So once I beat Art of Fighting 2 once I thought about trying to beat it a couple more times. Since I'd used Robert for the Neo Geo CD version, here is a playthrough with Takuma. He's probably the only other character I'll be able to beat this game with, since he has similar special moves to Ryo.

For some reason I found it far easier and much less frustrating to beat this game with Takuma than I did with Ryo or Robert. It must have only taken me about 4 or 5 attempts to do the playthrough with him. His throw seems to be pretty good since he recovers from it so quickly, and I only had to use his desperation move once! So far this playthrough also marks the only time I've managed to beat Geese without having to win at least one round via a time over.





Ryuuko no Ken Gaiden
Video length: 21:27
Game region:
Difficulty level: 4 out of 5

This is a playthrough of the Japanese version of the game, which is included on the Japanese version of Art of Fighting Anthology (Ryuuko no Ken Tenchijin). Thankfully it has an English language option. The third game is easier than the other two, but can still be tough.





SEGA Rally 2006
Video length: 8:28
Game region:
Difficulty level: 3 out of 5

Playthrough of the arcade mode's series 1 with the Peugeot 307 Sport. SEGA Rally 2006 was a PS2 exclusive entry in the series, and it was only released in Japan and South Korea. I have to admit, the main reason I got this game was because the special edition came with an arcade-accurate version of the original SEGA Rally, which I've done a playthrough of below:





SEGA Rally Championship
Video length: See below
Game region:
Difficulty level: 5 out of 5

The only reason I purchased SEGA Rally 2006 was because the special edition included this, the original game. It's basically an emulation of the arcade game, but it doesn't have the link mode. The arcade version of the game is easier than the Saturn version in terms of getting into 1st place -the CPU cars seem to be slower. But it's much, much harder to finish the extra course, Lakeside, without running out of time. I only just made it with the Lancia Delta.

For the Toyota Celica playthrough I used a cheat that makes the car faster, but also makes it more difficult to control.


Lancia Delta playthrough (09:40)
Toyota Celica playthrough (09:41)



Sonic R
Video length: 24 minutes & 54 seconds
Game region:
Difficulty level: 1 out of 5

Playthrough of each track with a different character. The reason I didn't have Super Sonic unlocked is because if you use a hidden character, one of the other racers will always be Super Sonic, who's utterly broken in terms of speed and somehow I doubt I'd ever beat him when using Eggrobo. This version of Sonic R was included on Sonic Gems Collection, and it lacks a 60hz option.

This came close to scoring a 0 out of 5, but I'll admit that winning a race with Amy, Eggrobo and Tails doll takes a little bit of actual effort.





Soulcalibur III
Video length: See below
Game region:
Difficulty level: 4 out of 5

Two playthroughs for this game, using Siegfried in both. The reason for this is because the game's story mode, Tales of Souls, features mutiple routes and endings for each character.

It's also significantly harder than the previous games in the series since the CPU has again been made smarter, plus all fights in this mode are only one round, meaning you've got no chance to screw up and try again. You can avoid some fights just be choosing not to do them, but there are some tough battles you have to do, such as fighting Abyss, the game's new boss.

The two videos show some of the different routes, and also have different endings. Which ending you see depends on if you complete the quick time event or not. For the second video I also used Siegfried's alternate costume and had English voices on instead of Japanese.


First playthrough (30:16)
Second playthrough (28:13)



Street Fighter
Video length: 14:08
Game region:
Difficulty level: 4 out of 5

The only way to beat this game on one credit is if you can pull off the special moves -the standard punches and kicks are a waste of time. Really you only need 2 of the 3 -I don't think the hurricane kick is that useful. But the fireball certainly is and the dragon punch does huge amounts of damage if done right next to the opponent.

There isn't much strategy to the game other than to just keep chucking out fireballs, although due to the game's bad controls you can often get dragon punches instead. This doesn't seem to matter though as a lot of the opponents you face seem to love jumping into them.

Only Adon and Sagat are a challenge, as both of them have powerful attacks which they can spam easily (Adon is really good at this). Sagat's tiger shot does huge amounts of damage. Be ready to wear your thumb out trying to beat this game.

This version of the game is featured on Capcom Classics Collection Vol. 2.





Street Fighter III 3rd Strike
Video length: 22:31
Game region:
Difficulty level: 3 out of 5

Playthrough with Ken. This game was never released in Europe, so I had to make do with the Japanese version. Gill is the only hard part of this game, but Ken seems to have a little bit of an advantage against him as if you can time your dragon punches right, you can keep spamming them every time Gill gets up from being knocked over.





Street Fighter Alpha 2 Gold
Video length: 21:32
Game region:
Difficulty level: 2 out of 5

Playthrough with Cammy. This version of the game is on Street Fighter Alpha Anthology. Apologies for my lousy playing, but I find the Dualshock 2 very difficult to use in this collection, the d-pad is terribly unresponsive. Cammy had been included in Street Fighter Alpha 2 Gold for the Playstation and SEGA Saturn, but couldn't be used in the arcade mode. The Playstation 2 version lets you use her in arcade mode, and she has a text-only ending sequence.





Street Fighter EX3
Video length: 13:01
Game region:
Difficulty level: 1 out of 5

I found this to be the easiest game to playthrough in the Street Fighter EX series, so much so that I even played through it on the hard setting. I picked Zangief, but this game differs from the others since as you beat opponents, you can have them join with you if you want, and then use them in later battles. This means I also use a few other characters.

I know there is a hidden boss to fight, but the requirements to get him to appear were too much for me to bother with.





Time Crisis II
Video length: See below
Game region: &
Difficulty level: 3 out of 5

This is a playthrough of the story mode with Keith, using the UK version. It went pretty well, and I only got hit once (in the final level). Time Crisis II is quite a bit easier than the first one, with the main difference being that you can now actually tell if an enemy bullet is going to hit you or not (watch out for the red projectiles).

Because of this it's far easier to stay out of cover for several seconds without worrying about if you're going to take a hit. And you now start with 4 lives instead of 3 per credit, which is nice. In general the bosses aren't as difficult as before either, especially Wild Dog.

I also did a co-op playthrough with Matt. This port features a split screen mode which is actually pretty difficult to use unless you've got a big TV. I managed to get through the game on a single credit (and took 1 hit, again) whilst Matt...didn't (he hadn't played a TC game for several years when I made him play this, so don't go and get mad at him). We used the Japanese version for this playthrough.

Namco's Guncon 2 lightguns were used for these playthroughs. The single player mode playthrough was the first video game playthrough I ever uploaded to Youtube, and is one of my most popular. As I barely knew what I was doing at the time I didn't record the game's intro.


Single player playthrough (25:11)
Co-op playthrough (28:32)



Time Crisis 3
Video length: See below
Game region:
Difficulty level: 4 out of 5

I guess Namco realised TCII was a bit too easy, so they made the third one harder. Several enemies types now have energy bars you have to deplete before they'll die, and there are some new things to look out for, such as flamethrowers. The stage 2 and 3 bosses are certainly harder than anything TCII featured.

You've got more than just the handgun this time round though as you can also use a machinegun, shotgun and grenade. These weapons have limited ammo but you can get more fairly often (shoot the yellow and white guys when they show up).

The first video is a playthrough of the single player mode with Alan. It went really well, I thought I'd take a least one hit before getting to the final boss, but I didn't. Instead I take just 1 hit during the final boss fight, right near the end, in a place I've never been hit before -only when recording, folks!

The second video is a playthrough of rescue mission mode. When TC3 was released in arcades, Alicia wasn't playable in it, but for the PS2 port, she's playable in her own story mode which shows what she's up to before and during the story. Her levels are even more challening than the others, as there are parts where you have to avoid shooting civilians and a couple of sections which require you to make precise shots with her sniper rifle.

Despite my game's box stating that this is the Japanese version, is also features on the back that the in-game text is in Chinese, which it is.


Single player playthrough (42:51)
Rescue Mission playthrough (48:29)



Virtua Fighter 2
Video length: 13:03
Game region:
Difficulty level: 5 out of 5

Virtua Fighter 2 is known as having some of the hardest CPU opponents of any fighting game ever made. It isn't too bad up until stage 5, where the difficulty spikes up and the CPU will blatantly cheat to beat you.

Unless you pick Jacky. The trick is to try and knock down your opponent with Jacky's beat knuckle (P+K) and once you've done this, back off. As the opponent gets up, they'll run towards you, and as they get close you need to use Jacky's knee snap (Forward, Back+P+K) throw. If timed right, Jacky will throw the opponent every time. At which point you need to back off again and then keep using the knee snap. Thanks to TerryxMasters for this info.

If you're feeling brave, you can use the stomp (Up+P) after the knee snap to do extra damage, but if you do this you won't have as much time to move away from your opponent before they get up. You can usually get away with it though.





Virtua Fighter 2 Mega Drive
Video length: 11:51
Game region:
Difficulty level: 2 out of 5

Playthrough with Kage, using the version of the game included on the SEGA Mega Drive Collection. The 16-bit version of Virtua Fighter 2 has CPU opponents who can be annoying at times, although overall it isn't as anywhere near as bad as the arcade version. Using Kage you can get through the game just be using two different combos: punch, punch, kick or punch, punch, punch, kick.





Virtua Fighter 4
Video length: 22:19
Game region:
Difficulty level: 5 out of 5

Playthrough with Wolf. Virtua Fighter 3 had farily reasonable CPU opponents, sadly for the sequel they made them obnoxious again. This game also has the longest single player mode in the series, as it makes you fight every character in the game.

So this means it's back to using your own cheap tactics to win. This time around you want to use Wolf, as the CPU has a lot of problems dealing with his running clothesline move. Towards the end of the game you can win matches just be using that move alone, and it'll even work on Dural.





Virtua Fighter 4: Evolution
Video length: 17:04
Game region:
Difficulty level: 5 out of 5

Playthrough with Wolf. This update to Virtua Fighter 4 adds two new characters and makes a ton of changes to the game, however, in terms of beating the arcade mode, you can use the exact same strategy with Wolf as before, so just spam that clothesline. And this game has less stages to beat than the original VF4 since you don't have to fight everybody, so it doesn't take as long.





Virtua Fighter 10th Anniversary
Video length: See below
Game region:
Difficulty level: 5 out of 5

Two playthroughs of this game: one for the VF1 route, the other for the Evolution route. Which opponents you have to fight depends on which route you have selected. This game is basically VF4 but with the graphcal style of the first game, so to beat it, just pick Wolf again and be ready to use his running clothesline a lot.


VF1 route playthrough (11:39)
Evolution route playthrough (11:10)



Virtua Racing
Video length: 15:22
Game region:
Difficulty level: 2 out of 5

This version of the game is included on SEGA Classics Collection. Somehow this version has issues with the draw distance, which is really noticable if you use the far away car view, although at least the graphics are arcade-accurate. This is a playthrough of the three tracks from the arcade version of the game, strangely SEGA forgot to include the ending for winning any race in this mode.

Compared to the previous versions of the game for SEGA consoles, this PS2 version is much easier to win at. One annoyance I have with it is the circuit map to the right of the screen, it's really huge and moves around as you turn the car, I find it distracting.